CHF10
So I bent the housing of the kickstand safety switch by going down a driveway in a new estate where there is no cutouts for the driveway. It's just a continuation of the gutter. I've always hated them. Anyway, the bent housing stopped the spring from pushing the switch thingy out so I couldn't ride home from Sydney! (was my first thought) So there I was at 6am, prying the thing out while my 66yr old Dad sat on the bike (and he's never sat on a bike in his life!) but there was no chance it was going to be working without some serious effort or replacement. And I had to get home because while it was going to be hot, the next day (today) was going to be worse.

Anyhow, I ended up removing the whole thing (two small bolts), pulling the switch thingy out and just cable tying it up out of the way. No more problems. But then I was thinking, instead of replacing it, can it just be disabled altogether? I.e. wire it so the ECU thinks the kickstand is up all the time?

On another note, I ended up leaving by 6:45am (45min late damn it) and it was 38 degrees by 11am! Left Holbrook at 40 degrees and it didn't drop below again the rest of the ride! Topped out at 45 degrees! The looks I got from what became my routine - ride, stop at a servo, neck a litre of Powerade, pour a full watering can over my head and face (with my helmet off), repeat until home just under 10hrs after I started... counted 12 HWP cars (one unmarked that followed me for 30min) in NSW before I stopped counting. ZERO in Victoria. Can't fault the bike though. Regardless of the heat it was smooth as it always is, responded how it always does and never missed a beat or felt hot. So maybe FNQ isn't out of the question after all... Hmmmm...
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V-Twin
I know two other riders who had issues with their kick stand switch.  One got stranded on the road trip (nearly like you).  The other had this happen on the day they were picking up their bike.  Behind the Melbourne dealer, there is a bike wash spot.  Surrounding that area is slightly raised ‘wall’ to prevent water from running off on to other bikes.  When my mate went to pick up his Dark Horse, the dealer guy road the bike out to the footpath for him... in the process, clipped the bottom of the bike on that ‘wall’ and knocked the switch.  They had to wheel it back in the workshop and replace that switch.

Since you have been able to bypass it, it seems possible to disable it completely CHF.
Let's be kind to one another.
Melbourne, Victoria
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CHF10
It's not bipassed. It's physically relocated. Just a way to get moving when I encountered the problem. I'd like to just remove the switch altogether but need to know what to do with/to the wires. 
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Dr.Shifty
It depends on the design whether it opens or closes when the stand is up. You might be able to trace the wire back to a plug and just pull the plug and stick the switch in the shed. If it needs the circuit to be closed to run the bike you'll need to fit a dummy plug that bridges the wires, then stick the switch in the shed.

I'm out of town at the moment and don't have the wiring diagram to chase it up.

If you take the bike for a rego inspection and they pick up that the switch isn't working you might fail the test. Here in NSW if there is something fitted as standard on the bike it needs to be working.

I agree with your dislike of those housing estates with no proper driveways. Riding up those rounded curbs is a nuisance on a low and heavy bike.
Cheers, Kim.

From Woodrising (no, nobody else has heard of it either)
Rides a Springfield Dark Horse
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CHF10

So apparently it's a matter of joining the wires to "delete" the switch and it's pretty simple.

The replacement switch is $65 though. So may as well keep it legal. (apparently it is a legal thing)

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crash
CHF10 wrote:

So apparently it's a matter of joining the wires to "delete" the switch and it's pretty simple.

The replacement switch is $65 though. So may as well keep it legal. (apparently it is a legal thing)



Agreed, I would think that it is either in the normally open or normally closed position.  When the side stand is up, normally closed, when the sidestand is down, normally open.  So all one should have to do is trick the system into thinking that the switch is normally closed and should be good to go.  Hope I never have to put that theory to the test 😃
Ulysses #30673
IMRG #AU100394
Current: RoadMaster (ebony and ivory)
Highett Victoria Australia
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tallackn
I'd be lost without that safety cutout.  More than once a week I find myself kicking the bike into gear when the stand is still down.  I'm sure I would have come unstuck by now without that safety on my bikes.
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Robbo
I bashed one on Dark Horse 1.0 going down Kerb and it broke the and I was stuck. I managed to get it back to a position where I could carefully raise the stand and activate it.
I cabled tied it in back place when I got home and it worked fine.
Another option to by pass it is to cable tie the button in, if you have to an inspection or service you just cut the tie.
2017 Dark Horse  - Stage 2, Rush Pipes

Location - Perth, Western Australia
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CHF10
Robbo wrote:
I bashed one on Dark Horse 1.0 going down Kerb and it broke the and I was stuck. I managed to get it back to a position where I could carefully raise the stand and activate it.
I cabled tied it in back place when I got home and it worked fine.
Another option to by pass it is to cable tie the button in, if you have to an inspection or service you just cut the tie.


Kickstand up is button out. Which is how I have mine at the moment. I removed the whole switch and cable tied it to the frame with the switch out to solve my original problem when I squashed mine.
Live free or die!
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