red Scout jj
My Scout is now 16 months old and done 14000 km last week I tried to start my bike but battery was completely flat took more than overnight to be fully charged , I never had this problem on Japanese bikes and battery's would last up to 5 years yet one in my Scout is only 18 months old . any other Scout owners with same problem as me .
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V-Twin
Hey Red... do you use battery tender?  If I don't ride for a week or more, I plug my bike in.  I don't know if it is a myth but I've heard that motorcycle batteries start to lose capacity longer it is not used.

So just for the sake of discussion, if a bike came out with 100% battery capacity... if that motorcycle was to sit around for long or only go on short rides (battery doesn't have time to fully charge), after a few months, it might be down 20%.  I don't mean the 'charge' but 'capacity'.  Even if you plug the battery charger, that lost 20% is said to be lost for good.  Repeat the above scenario and the battery will continue to lose capacity.  Until one day, even after a full charge, it cannot start the bike more than a few times.

Since I am not certain if what I said is a myth or fact, I would invite anyone with knowledge to confirm or deny what I just said please.

Red, I'm not suggesting that you had your bike sitting around for 6 months without ever riding it.  I only mentioned above as one possible scenario for someone, one day.  You could have easily got a bad battery.  In fact, I think I have heard about Scout battery has been replaced by the dealership on few bikes.
Let's be kind to one another.
Melbourne, Victoria
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Hunter
Can't really confirm or deny the myth as a whole, but I have had several motorcycle batteries that have seemed to follow that same pattern before I started using a tender. My little fifty cc scooter has a flat battery, but it also has a kick starter so I never bother replacing it.

As for the scout, haven't had it long enough to kill the battery, but I won't be able to ride it for ten days, so it's sitting on a tender right now. I've always heard these little batteries are more sensitive than car batteries. At which point I ask why not use a car battery? And everyone looks at me like I grew a third head.
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ozduo
My scout battery needed to be replaced after 10 months. I am a regular rider and had travelled about 20.000k. It measured 13.5volts but dropped to almost zero under load
cost me a tow & I had to pay for another battery.
The good news was that the chk eng error stopped appearing after the battery was changed 
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V-Twin
ozduo wrote:
I had to pay for another battery.
I was under the impression the battery came with at least 12 months warranty?  Your battery didn't just lose 'capacity', it sounds like it died.
Let's be kind to one another.
Melbourne, Victoria
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Dazza
My battery failed after 2 weeks Imagine had the bike 2 weeks don't ride to work so Saturday morning going for a ride waited all week to do this only 3rd time on my own Scout and a dead battery. Rang Indian dealership Can't help you with a battery fitting no servicing Saturdays.

But a truck can pick up bike and take to Workshop for Manday morning. I was not Impressed.
Got a new battery no charge but I had to go and collect bike from Dealership would not deliver back to my house.
I Don't go there anymore I use a Indian Licensed Repair agent where I get treated as a valued customer
Dazza
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Robbo
I have been told by an auto sparky that wet cell batteries have a hard time in motorcycles because they get bounced around a lot more and the small batteries typically last less than a car battery anyway.
Add this to the fact that lead acid batteries in general aren't as long lasting or solid as they once were (pick up car battery from the 70's and a new one and see how much lighter they are (that is less lead which is a key component)
The gel batteries or absorbed glass matt batteries are more robust but cost 3 times as much.
As motorcycles are often occasional use they tend to lose charge sitting aroind and the more often you charge a depleted battery the less life it will have. Typically ridden everyday bikes will have a better battery life because they stay fully charged.
So as suggested by others a trickle charger is the way to go. But make sure that is not constant trickle and has a maintenance charge once the battery is full or you will also shorten the life.
2017 Dark Horse  - Stage 2, Rush Pipes

Location - Perth, Western Australia
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Dr.Shifty
I've never had problems with motorcycle batteries dying too soon, and I suspect that the theory that V-Twin speaks of is myth. My experience has been that batteries go for a specific reason. Mostly they sulphate up because of the constant chemical reaction going on inside. A sulphated battery goes nowhere.

Some places used to sell 'recon' batteries. They would hit the battery with a short burst of 240 volts and this would shock the plates and the sulphate burn off and sink to the bottom. It was exposed as a scam years ago as it also damages the battery but there might be people around who still do it.

Leaving a lead acid battery for long periods will reduce it's life as they need to charge/recharge. My other bike, the battery lasted six years - then my wife got ill with cancer and I stopped riding until some time after she died. The battery was gone by the time I got back on the bike after ten months sitting in the shed. I replaced it with a LiPo battery, and the kick that thing has is extraordinary.

The LiPo battery also lasts longer without charging, as in towards a year and it's going to be still OK.

The OP who's battery lasted 18 months sounds like a faulty battery from the start. And obviously faulty for Daza with the battery gone in weeks.

Most chargers sold these days will monitor battery charge and can be safely left connected.
Cheers, Kim.

From Woodrising (no, nobody else has heard of it either)
Rides a Springfield Dark Horse
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Nooscout
Hi red Scout jj,

My 2015 Scout battery failed at 12,000ks(15 months old) when I was travelling in north Qld. Had to buy a SSB Lithium Ion motorcycle battery in Emerald, only thing I could get. Same capacity as the original, half the size and one fifth of the weight.

I have never looked back.Tons of power and never looses charge between uses. Can be left for many months without loosing charge. Can't use a battery minder on it though, but it doesn't need one.

Returned the failed battery to Brisbane Indian and they honoured the warranty by taking the cost of a new Indian battery off my scheduled Service cost. The guys at Brisbane Indian are the best, Always helpful!! I totally trust them with my Scout.

Check out the SSB Lithium Ion battery I bought, at the SSB website: - http://www.ssbpowersport.com.au
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red Scout jj
Thanks  Mate I will  take your  advice  next time battery  let me down  . 
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MartyO
My wife owns a Scout: bought 2015.  Bike was on a trickle charger most 2016 as we were riding in America.  Back home bike went into dealer and was there for about three months.  Picked it up: bike started straight away.  Next morning wife wants to go for ride: battery dead.  Dealer gives new battery.  Goes well for some months then starts going flat.  Recharge again.
  One day we both go for a ride about town.  Mine is a second-hand 2009 Kawasaki VN 1700.  Come home, wife's bike takes 65-70 minutes.  Mine: 8 minutes.  Did this several times, checking timings to recharge batteries.  Same times.
  Just recently we did a trip to Tassy.  Some longer days riding.  Checked times just on her bike: about 8-10 minutes to charge.
  It appears to me that short rides really chew the battery up on her bike, but not mine.  I also own a 1973 Kawasaki Z1.  I have NO hassles with it riding short trips and starting.
  I've checked battery voltage running (13.85V) and not running (12.9V), so am at a loss where the power is going!
  Again, short trips are detrimental to batteries, I believe, on Indian Scouts.
  Other than this, I think my wife has made an extremely wonderful choice in her motorbike (and husband).
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trwaterman
My battery was dead the day I went to pick the bike up?? Has been OK (sort of) since but ever now and then it plays up for no particular reason. Just got back from 2 weeks away in car and bike battery was flat as a maggot. (forgot to put on trickle charger) Recharged and appears OK again??? Watch this space although may replace it next service if I don't replace the bike. (see recent post re drive cog) Starting to fall out of love with the Scout and may be up for a divorce. 
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Dr.Shifty
Nooscout wrote:

Had to buy a SSB Lithium Ion motorcycle battery in Emerald, only thing I could get. Same capacity as the original, half the size and one fifth of the weight.

I have never looked back.Tons of power and never looses charge between uses. Can be left for many months without loosing charge. Can't use a battery minder on it though, but it doesn't need one.

Check out the SSB Lithium Ion battery I bought, at the SSB website: - http://www.ssbpowersport.com.au


I've had an SSB lithium battery on my Kawasaki for three years. When i picked up the box at the shop I had to ask the guy if it had a battery in it. I like the super-instant start.

You can put them on a battery tender but have to get one designed for the lithium battery. When I bought my Scout and didn't ride the Kawasaki so much I got one that cost me about $80.
This one: 
LiPo tender.jpg 
Cheers, Kim.

From Woodrising (no, nobody else has heard of it either)
Rides a Springfield Dark Horse
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