V-Twin
If you own an Indian Chief Vintage running on wire wheels, no doubt you share my frustration.  You want to check your tyre pressure regularly, but access to the rear valve is restricted.  Firstly, the skirted rear fender, then the tyre valve pointing straight  (not bent 90 degrees - not possible on tubes), then the brake rotor and the exhaust gets in the way, etc.,

It has taken me some trial and error, but I think I got it to work consistently.

Early on, I purchased a 135-degree air valve extender from eBay for $5.  It was fiddly (need 3 hands: one hand to hold the extender so it doesn’t bend the valve; 2nd hand to push the air chuck firmly against the extender to feed air; 3rd hand to squeeze the pump trigger - now replaced by rubber band.), but it can work.  The trick is, not to put too much pressure on the rubber valve stem by bending 😬  Instant tow truck job!  🙈

IMG_0154.JPG 
I always parked the bike and pushed it back and forward until the rear tyre valve was located right at the bottom of the wheel (6 o'clock position). This was a mistake on my part.  It works better when the valve is located on 7 or 8 o'clock position (indicated by the red dot) - at least for me. That's assuming your air hose is coming from the front of the bike.  If your air hose is coming from the back of the bike, it might work better in at the 4 o'clock position?  By the way, the hose should run right next to the tyre, under the guard.  The illustration below is just showing how the air hose will be routed.

IMG_0153.JPG 

Why do I do this?  The air hose does not have to be bent as much to line up with the valve.  IF you own a small 90 degree bent chuck, ignore the above step as you probably don't have any issues checking your tyre pressure.

Secondly, you need a small air chuck on a cheap (flimsy) air hose attached to your pump.  Why flimsy?  It can be bent easily... which is necessary to line up the chuck to the valve head-on, even with the above 'trick'.

IMG_0156.JPG 
I have also tried one of these chuck (below) but it does not work well as the chuck does NOT seal around the valve properly.  The valve does not sit deep enough inside the chuck to guide it to ensure proper fit.  Whenever I used this chuck, I lost more air than I pumped.  😤😟

IMG_0155.JPG 

I have NOT found the holy grail of air chuck yet.  I am still looking for a small air chuck with 90 degrees bend in it.  It will also have to be quality construction as everything is made cheap these days.  If you own or found a small chuck, please let me know.  I think something like this will work well for me.

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Let's be kind to one another.
Melbourne, Victoria
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Richard Dixon

Thanks V-twin.. great information good pictures...I will speak to a mate who runs a tyre store to see if any other chucks are available...

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Seefriedm
Outstanding fix🎉 Thank you for sharing 
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V-Twin
Glad my experience of trial and error can assist someone else.
Let's be kind to one another.
Melbourne, Victoria
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Nudge
I have the same issue, with my rear tyre on my scout. Thanks V for sharing, I'm going to have a look on eBay for a 45 degree air valve extender myself!! I'm sure it's going to fix my problem to!!! Thanks👍
Cheers 👍
Leo
Sunbury, Victoria
IMRG: AU101514
2017 Indian Scout.

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Croc
I've been using a 45 deg chuck for years now, had the same problem with my old Harley re pumping air into the tyres.
I got my last ones from my local tyre place, only cost me a couple of bucks.  Got two & keep one on me when going on
long trips (it fits into the fob pocket in my jeans) also got the other one with the toolkit or at home as a spare.

My Scout has the front tyre valve extended out at an angle but not the rear??!!  Therefore I use the extender on that (as well as the Harley)
also.  I am unable to find a brand name for the valve chuck but it looks like this.

20180617_092145.jpg 
The thicker part (at the bottom of this pickie) goes to the bike valve, it is thick enough to put on with light gloves on, not
so good with gauntlets.  The silver cap comes off & fits to the hose like a normal air valve.  This has an inbuilt valve &
you don't lose air taking it off (or on) if you're careful.

Hope this helps, serious, these bloody things are a life saver!  Can't remember how many times I burnt my hands on pipes or
brake calipers trying to get air into my tyres before I had them.  (the servos could at least have bent pieces on the end of their
hoses).
I'm Not Completely Useless . .
I Can Be Used As A Bad Example!

Kwinana W.A.

Ulysses   #48275
IMRG      #100932
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crash
I had a 45 degree bend adapter on my kwaka.  Problem was something hit it (maybe a rock or something) loosened it and let my tyre down.  That was not such a good thing so if you use one make sure that it is not going to get loosened.  When I changed my tyre, I asked for a bent valve and now I don't have the problem.
Ulysses #30673
IMRG #AU100394
Current: RoadMaster (ebony and ivory)
Highett Victoria Australia
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V-Twin
crash wrote:
I had a 45 degree bend adapter on my kwaka.
I would be little reluctant to attach anything to the tyre valve.  The weight of the adapter combined with the centrifugal force of spinning wheel may damage or rip the valve off.
Let's be kind to one another.
Melbourne, Victoria
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Croc
Hm, probably didn't make it too clear (apart from saying I carry adaptor in pocket of jeans) but this thingie is NOT something
you would keep permanently attached to the bike.  Mate tried that years ago & found out the hard way, it will destroy the
existing valve stem.  This product is only for use when using the tyre pump.
If you can find a stock setup valve that is bent out or attached to the side of the rims, cool.  But not too may sickles have that.
The adaptor is the next best option I have found, but NO, don't leave it attached.  
As V-Twin stated, centrifical force is not to be toyed with!   
I'm Not Completely Useless . .
I Can Be Used As A Bad Example!

Kwinana W.A.

Ulysses   #48275
IMRG      #100932
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crash
Yup, I found out the hard way as well.
Ulysses #30673
IMRG #AU100394
Current: RoadMaster (ebony and ivory)
Highett Victoria Australia
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CHF10

V-Twin wrote:
I would be little reluctant to attach anything to the tyre valve.  The weight of the adapter combined with the centrifugal force of spinning wheel may damage or rip the valve off.

Not to mention create an imbalance in the wheel.

Live free or die!
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Dr.Shifty
Croc wrote:
Hm, probably didn't make it too clear (apart from saying I carry adaptor in pocket of jeans) but this thingie is NOT something
you would keep permanently attached to the bike.  Mate tried that years ago & found out the hard way, it will destroy the
existing valve stem.  This product is only for use when using the tyre pump.
If you can find a stock setup valve that is bent out or attached to the side of the rims, cool.  But not too may sickles have that.
The adaptor is the next best option I have found, but NO, don't leave it attached.  
As V-Twin stated, centrifical force is not to be toyed with!   


Here's an insight into centrifugal force on the bike wheel.

A local mate of mine and his son race on the Isle of Mann where things can get very fast. The son was having trouble keeping his tyres inflated and was having to check them every few laps. They worked out that the centrifugal force was pushing the valve down very slightly and the plastic caps allowed air to escape. So they changed to metal valve caps with washers inside to give a tighter seal. That solved the problem.

For tubeless tyres you can get 90 degree valve stems that mount securely to the rim. Leaving a temp bent stem on while you ride is a no no.
Cheers, Kim.

From Woodrising (no, nobody else has heard of it either)
Rides a Springfield Dark Horse
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CHF10

That's AMAZING!!! The forces are enough to push the valve down... FARK!!!

[isle-man-tt-racer]

Live free or die!
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