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Vintage 65
That' s interesting on the 36 psi on the 19 and 46 on the 16 inch. From my experience so far the death wobble story hasn't any truth in it. I would guess that rumour may have come from the lips of somebody riding another brand bike. (Not sure which one that would be. LoL )
From what I've experienced it seems to be the rite pressure for getting maximum life out of that tyre with the way the springfield distributes its weight.
That said the 36 psi for a different tyre on the same bike makes more sense to me.
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Robbo
All of the Chief's use the same frame with the exception of the upper frame section that has the Steering head and the top frame tube. This is where the different rakes is achieved. I discovered this when looking at repair options when I crashed Dark Horse 1.0.
In the attached pic it is part number 1. All other frame sections have the same part number across models. It is therefore possible change the rake of a Chief platform bike to any across the range.
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2017 Dark Horse  - Stage 2, Rush Pipes

Location - Perth, Western Australia
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V-Twin
Robbo wrote:
It is therefore possible change the rake of a Chief platform bike to any across the range. 
Nice info Robbo.  
Let's be kind to one another.
Melbourne, Victoria
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Lapis Lazuli
Thank you to all who have contributed to this post with such comprehensive and compelling information. I recently checked the manual for my 2017 Springfield to see what the recommendations were for the tyre pressures and found the higher front psi fairly perplexing.

Today I have been doing more research on this and thankfully found this post. 
Happy riding everyone! 
Cheers 
Jillian 
Lapis Lazuli
2017 Scout - Blue/White
2017 Springfield - Black 

"The only thing better than an Indian... is a woman riding one"
Here's to the women, who make the other women wish they could ride too.
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JuanPoop
Howdy learned colleagues.

There are several tyre pressure threads on the USA forum, but I couldn't find one here, specifically for the SF.

Many USA riders have queried the 46 Front and 41 Rear stated in the manual and there has been much debate about the ideal pressures under various riding set-ups and road conditions.  There are apparent "tyre experts" in the USA who swear by the stated pressures, which are seemingly driven by some sort of speed wobble (especially at higher speeds) that the high-ish pressure of the front tyre counteracts.  There are other apparent "tyre experts" who swear by different pressures, for various reasons.   

I am not here to dispute any of that.  I am just wondering what the Australian take is on this and whether Aussie riders (of SFs particularly) have experimented with other pressures to get an optimum feel.

Happy to hear from any 111 riders of course, just hoping some fellow SFers chime in.

p.s. if the Moderators know of another thread that covers this well - feel free to move this, or direct me to it...

aka - John
2017 Springfield - grey / burgundy
Northern Beaches - Sydney
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V-Twin
JuanPoop wrote:
p.s. if the Moderators know of another thread that covers this well - feel free to move this, or direct me to it...
Hey JP, your thread has been moved to the existing thread.
Let's be kind to one another.
Melbourne, Victoria
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David
JuanPoop wrote:
Howdy learned colleagues.

There are several tyre pressure threads on the USA forum, but I couldn't find one here, specifically for the SF.

Many USA riders have queried the 46 Front and 41 Rear stated in the manual and there has been much debate about the ideal pressures under various riding set-ups and road conditions.  There are apparent "tyre experts" in the USA who swear by the stated pressures, which are seemingly driven by some sort of speed wobble (especially at higher speeds) that the high-ish pressure of the front tyre counteracts.  There are other apparent "tyre experts" who swear by different pressures, for various reasons.   

I am not here to dispute any of that.  I am just wondering what the Australian take is on this and whether Aussie riders (of SFs particularly) have experimented with other pressures to get an optimum feel.

Happy to hear from any 111 riders of course, just hoping some fellow SFers chime in.

p.s. if the Moderators know of another thread that covers this well - feel free to move this, or direct me to it...


I have been running the pressures stated in the manual with no problems
2017 Indian Springfield
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JuanPoop

V-Twin wrote:
Hey JP, your thread has been moved to the existing thread.


Thanks V-Twin, I must have had a man's look... 

aka - John
2017 Springfield - grey / burgundy
Northern Beaches - Sydney
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JuanPoop
OK, now that I have been directed to the existing thread (woops!), I have a question for the gang.

As I understand it, the tyre pressures stated were to ensure that speed wobbles are avoided when at high-ish cruising speeds and potentially two-up, due to the rake of the bike, the trail of the SF, the size of the front wheel and the angle of the dangle - or something like that...

If I do all my riding solo, with relatively low weight on the back (small pack on rack - sometimes) ... AND ... because I live in the great nanny state of Oz-land (where we have been scared out of our wits to do more the 10kph over the limit) and therefore I "always" ride to the speed limit 🙃, does that mean I should run slightly lower tyre pressures than stated?  Thinking that these tyre pressures may have been stipulated by the engineers on a worst case basis. 

Or am I just makin' sh1t up? 

aka - John
2017 Springfield - grey / burgundy
Northern Beaches - Sydney
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V-Twin
JuanPoop wrote:
the angle of the dangle
😝 ...I’m pretty sure that’s the cause of pretty much everything that is not right in the world. 😜

In regards to your question about “safe to lower the pressure”... no one short of Polaris engineers can answer that for you.  

The story goes that Polaris and Dunlop worked together to come up with this ‘solution’.  The speculation is for ‘safety’.  If that info is accurate, anything less would be considered ‘less safe’?

If you are concerned about the high tyre pressure; (a) you can risk it on lower psi; or (b) if the front end geometry of your Springfield is identical to later model SF, maybe replacing the front wheel with a 19-inch wheel ($$$$$).

My concern is what happens if uou want to change the tyres with another brand?  I wouldn’t ride at the factory recommended psi.  I don’t have any easy answers.
Let's be kind to one another.
Melbourne, Victoria
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JuanPoop
V-Twin wrote:
😝 ...I’m pretty sure that’s the cause of pretty much everything that is not right in the world. 😜

In regards to your question about “safe to lower the pressure”... no one short of Polaris engineers can answer that for you.  

The story goes that Polaris and Dunlop worked together to come up with this ‘solution’.  The speculation is for ‘safety’.  If that info is accurate, anything less would be considered ‘less safe’?

If you are concerned about the high tyre pressure; (a) you can risk it on lower psi; or (b) if the front end geometry of your Springfield is identical to later model SF, maybe replacing the front wheel with a 19-inch wheel ($$$$$).

My concern is what happens if uou want to change the tyres with another brand?  I wouldn’t ride at the factory recommended psi.  I don’t have any easy answers.


Thanks V, yes that last point is a concern.  Makes us feel a little stuck with the Dunlops, not that I have any particular issue with them, just having more choice is preferred.

I understand that the engineers set all of this up due to safety concerns ... and it is a good thing that they did.

I see some of our USA brethren boast of cruising at 80-90mph (around 140-150kph) on some of their highways (in certain states), but that is fairly rare in these parts (with me anyway).  I was sitting on 5 points remaining recently and have been doing a decent "Driving Miss Daisy" impersonation for quite a while until the available balance is a little prettier.  

What I am trying to explore, and I accept that it is difficult for us mere mortals to answer, is that if they came up with this set-up because of a specific worst case scenario (two-up at high speed), then what (if anything) changes if I am never two-up and never over say 120kph?  



aka - John
2017 Springfield - grey / burgundy
Northern Beaches - Sydney
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Harry Graeve

I am certainly no motorcycle tyre expert, although I have spent many years around tyres for cars and trucks.

What I do know is that car manufacturers (at least) try and find a tyre pressure that balances out comfort, performance and fuel economy.

So...if you run lower pressures than prescribed you may get a smoother ride, but your steering and braking will become soggy and your fuel usage will increase. If you run higher pressures your steering will sharpen up and your fuel economy will improve, but you will get a choppier ride. Another issue is that the tread pattern in an under inflated tyre closes up meaning the tyre can't pump as much water out from underneath itself in wet conditions.

Also keep in mind that the tyres at their recommended pressures make up part of the suspension system, when you change wheel size, tyre profile or width it changes the characteristics of the car.

I would have no reason to think that a motorcycle tyre would be different. The higher the PSI (within reason) the better the performance as the tyre itself will be less prone to flexing under cornering.

I would certainly have to learn a whole lot more about bike tyres, but running 46psi doesn't concern me.

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