dutch
Hi there I am looking to get a K&P oil filter we talking about the S1 model.

Now here starts the problem they are looking good and the oilfilter list is massive for bikes and cars but when you go on forums (bikes and cars) it a mixed bag almost 50/50 for and against. I am using the stage 1 airfilter from Indian and I clean that filter every 5000 km.

so my question is there somebody who got experience or so that can help me make up my mind I like the idea of not dumping a oilfilter every 5000 km but is it worth the money $ 139 US
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V-Twin
I use Indian High Flow air filter (reusable) and have used K&N air cleaner elements (also reusable) in the past on other engines but I am reluctant to use reusable oil filter.  I have never even heard of K&P.  Not only is it messy to clean but if I don’t clean properly and tiny little metal particles stay within the filter, I could be reintroducing them back in to the new oil.  I can see the appeal from cost saving point of view but... maybe someone who is more mechanically competent may not have any issues.
Let's be kind to one another.
Melbourne, Victoria
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BigTone
I don't think it is worth reusing an oil filter.. My opinion.. not an expert.
Cheers,
Tony
St. Kilda  Victoria
IMRG: 20380071
Current Ride: 2020 Dark Horse Challenger 
Previous Ride: 2015 Roadmaster
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Dr.Shifty
Lots of people use the reusable oil filters and speak well of them. The question about whether it's worth the money is easy.

The K&P is $139 US, that's $173 Au.
How much will you pay for a standard filter?
How many filters add up to $173?
How many kms is that?
How long does it take you do ride that far?

My Kawasaki filters are almost $20. That's about 9 filters and I change them at 5,000km = 45,000km to pay for it. I will be swapping the bike before then.

I've no idea how much an Indian filter is but I can't imagine them to be out of range of any other filter.

Whether it works as well as a disposable filter is another matter.

I remember in my teen years there was a guy going round the country shows with a reusable oil filter thing that used a roll of toilet paper as the element. The oil passed from one end to the other, working it's way between the layers. Of course he spoke very highly of it. I suppose the fact that he could drive his demo car to the next show was proof that it worked. 😉
Cheers, Kim.

From Woodrising (no, nobody else has heard of it either)
Rides a Springfield Dark Horse
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dutch
I'm keeping my bike I'm at 50000 km now and when I was at 35000 km I could get $20000 no thanks I thought now my bike is a bit older now point for trade in when I'm due I buy a new one plenty of time to save, and oilfilter $25 every 5000km is something to think about, they do have a magnet built in the filter. Nothing easy when it comes to these things
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Ian Petrie
I've  had one of the K&P oil filters  on all my bikes since  2009 in fact its the same one and its easy to clean and you cane see what is happening  inside your motor because  of the magnet there also the best high flo filter on the market.I love it but every one has there own opinion  your  choice  in the end.
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dutch
Thanks for your post and experience with the K&P filter that is what I wanted the read both good and bad experience so I can make up my mind
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Robbo
The Holden Grey motor had a replaceable element which could be  replaced with a toilet roll instead of the replacement filter, similar to Shifty' s recollection about someone trying to flog a similar set up. 
Harleys into the 70's also had replaceable element oil filters which work well.
These where fine but I would draw the line at re-usable oil filters. The potential risks outweigh the costs. Oil filters keep nasty crap out off the engine. Anything that might compromise this is a bad idea
2017 Dark Horse  - Stage 2, Rush Pipes

Location - Perth, Western Australia
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Crazyhorse
I was given a Scotts reusable oil filter for my Classic, and after doing some home work, and seeing it filters WAY better than a standard filter (surgical stainless steel filter as used for blood and plasma) and also has fins on the outside to act as an oil cooler, I fitted it.
Only been on there 2,300 kms so far but when I clean it I'll be sure and tell, cos I'm one of those weird mechanics who cuts oil filters open and has a look.
Ps. I'm keeping this bike till I die.
Life's too short to ride a Harley.
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Dr.Shifty
My 1960s Honda had a centrifugal oil filter. The oil passed through a little drum that spun on the end of the crankshaft. Centrifugal force threw any bits and pieces to the outside, which was the inside wall of the drum. It just stuck there until cleaned. At cleaning time a cover was removed and the inner wall of the drum could be wiped out. The built up crud was like a layer of felt that had to be cleaned off, something like a wet version of a lint filter in a clothes dryer. And that was all the filtering the oil received.
Cheers, Kim.

From Woodrising (no, nobody else has heard of it either)
Rides a Springfield Dark Horse
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Crazyhorse
Dr.Shifty wrote:
My 1960s Honda had a centrifugal oil filter. The oil passed through a little drum that spun on the end of the crankshaft. Centrifugal force threw any bits and pieces to the outside, which was the inside wall of the drum. It just stuck there until cleaned. At cleaning time a cover was removed and the inner wall of the drum could be wiped out. The built up crud was like a layer of felt that had to be cleaned off, something like a wet version of a lint filter in a clothes dryer. And that was all the filtering the oil received.

Ha ha , yep and on British bikes that little centrifuge is inside the crankshaft and when it gets full,( cos you have to split the cases to get to it) no oil gets to the big ends, All of a sudden ...... BANG!!
Life's too short to ride a Harley.
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