CHF10
Not sure if it's a problem or issue but I have noticed some rough or "notchy" feeling gear changes. Anyone else had these at all?
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faceonahead
no sorry, nothing more than a usual big T-Twin clunk into 1st 
2020 Challenger Dark Horse, stage 1 pipes and air and a stack of minor mostly cosmetic mods
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V-Twin
Kristopher wrote:
Not sure if it's a problem or issue but I have noticed some rough or "notchy" feeling gear changes.
If your Thunder Stroke is shifting notchier or rougher than usual (compared to before), I would assume your clutch cable stretched a little and need adjusting.  The difference between properly adjusted clutch cable and not, makes a noticeable difference.

If someone new to Indian TS111 is making the same comment, I concur with Face and say the new owner might not be use to big v-twins.  Having said that, how gears shift on TS111 between a handful of them can vary a lot.  Some are smooth as butter, while others are very clunky and notchy.  Some of them can be ironed out with proper clutch cable adjustment, while others cannot.  Welcome to loose tolerances that is Indian engineering.  Luck of the draw.
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Melbourne, Victoria
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Damich
Mine changes with no issues, smooth as. But you know when you engage first gear like all V Twins. 
Damian
North East Melb
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CHF10
Not my first V-Twin. My 1100 V-Star could shift smooth without the clutch! Most of my changes on the TS111 are smooth, some just feel rough, like two notchy movements.

Worth taking it in for an adjustment you reckon?
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V-Twin
Kristopher wrote:
Not my first V-Twin. My 1100 V-Star could shift smooth without the clutch! Most of my changes on the TS111 are smooth, some just feel rough, like two notchy movements.

Worth taking it in for an adjustment you reckon?
Was your Indian smooth or less rough before?  If it has been always like this (rough), difficult to say.  However, getting the clutch adjusted is first thing I would do.  While very conscious of squeezing the clutch lever fully.  Sometimes, leather wrap on grips can be enough to make gear shifting notchy.

Secondly, I would remove the Indian branded oil and switch to quality oil like Penrite or other... be careful choosing oil. You don’t want oil with friction modifier or clutch will start to slip.

Third thing I would do is to ride several other Indians.  Compare several other gear boxes.  Of course, no guarantees that other bikes have well adjusted clutch but you will still get an idea of what is smooth and what is rough.

As I said before, some TS111 gear boxes are smoother than others due to manufacturing variations.  In 2014 TS111, cold shift was an issue.
Let's be kind to one another.
Melbourne, Victoria
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CHF10

So being very conscious of everything above this morning, all very smooth.

I should point out the notchiness is really only down shifting. Mostly 2nd to 1st once stopped.

I am focussing on my riding style at the moment. Taking an extra few milliseconds to make sure clutch fully engaged before shifting. Up and down.

And I've always been a downshift blipper - comes from racing - what the concensus here?

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crash
I normally find that if I am coming up to service time on the bike, the gear changes become a little more "agricultural" (as one mechanic described it).  This could be due to, not only the clutch cable needing adjustment but also the clutch itself needing a bit of tweaking.

The clutch cable pulls a lever which in turn pushes on a pin in the middle of the clutch housing.  This pin pushes the clutch basket away from the friction plate basket thereby releasing the pressure between the friction plates and the clutch plates.  Over time the clutch plates wear and the distance between the two baskets needs to be reset.  Nothing to worry about this is normal. 

What you don't want to do however is give the gear lever a whole heap of boot to get it into gear.  This could bend the locator dogs on the gears and that would cause a whole heap of hurt.  Did that with the vulcan voyager and they said that I was going to have to split the case to get it fixed.  Traded it in resolved my issue (was part of my decision to get a new bike because it was going to cost $2k to fix - apparently)
Ulysses #30673
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Current: RoadMaster (ebony and ivory)
Highett Victoria Australia
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Harro
I have a 2014 TS 111 and it can be a little 'agricultural' changing up until it warms up and then it's a smooth as - always has been.  Don't seem to have an issue down changing but I tend to speed match (blip) when changing down.
Cheers,
Harro

Red Vintage
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JuanPoop
Hey Harro - serious question, not trying to smart or anything...cos I am getting back into bikes after a long break. 

Do you mean rev matching instead of speed matching?

Just trying to clarify, for my own learning.

If not, could you explain the difference please.

aka - John
2017 Springfield - grey / burgundy
Northern Beaches - Sydney
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Harro

JuanPoop wrote:
Hey Harro - serious question, not trying to smart or anything...cos I am getting back into bikes after a long break. 

Do you mean rev matching instead of speed matching?

Just trying to clarify, for my own learning.

If not, could you explain the difference please.


Really same thing.  Blipping engine to increase its speed so that it matches higher speed of clutch plate in the lower gear you are changing down to.  With the lower gear the clutch disk is spinning at higher revs than engine and has higher torque than that of the higher gear that the engine was running in before you changed down. Think small wheel traveling at higher speed versus bigger wheel spinning at slower speed & hence lower torque.  That's why if you drop into a lower gear quickly without rev or engine speed matching by speeding up the engine with a blip you can get some serious torque lock of your rear wheel and some serious trouble.
Cheers,
Harro

Red Vintage
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JuanPoop
Harro wrote:



Really same thing.  Blipping engine to increase its speed so that it matches higher speed of clutch plate in the lower gear you are changing down to.  With the lower gear the clutch disk is spinning at higher revs than engine and has higher torque than that of the higher gear that the engine was running in before you changed down. Think small wheel traveling at higher speed versus bigger wheel spinning at slower speed & hence lower torque.  That's why if you drop into a lower gear quickly without rev or engine speed matching by speeding up the engine with a blip you can get some serious torque lock of your rear wheel and some serious trouble.


Good one, I was getting a little confused between speed of bike and speed of engine/clutch. 
All clear now - thanks. 
I have been doing some blipping between gear changes and it certainly makes a difference when I get it right. 
Still working on my coordination to be better at it!!
Cheers.

aka - John
2017 Springfield - grey / burgundy
Northern Beaches - Sydney
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CHF10
Mine are all smooth now. It's funny, leading up to the 800km service they were find. A bit "notchy" and rough just after, but have smoothed back out now. Man I love this bike!
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