Andy Davis
Hi, has anyone come up with a concept for a fuel gauge for a scout bobber, the wife really would like one on hers
Cheers
Andy
"Just because my path is different, doesn't mean i'm lost"
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Croc
In the interim your good Lady might do what I do.  I keep track of the fuel used (i.e. zero the distance counter when I fuel up & keep track of the kms).  I have a rough idea of how far a full tank will get me & adjust for that.  (there's always the low fuel icon as a last resort!)
I'm Not Completely Useless . .
I Can Be Used As A Bad Example!

Kwinana W.A.

Ulysses   #48275
IMRG      #100932
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Andy Davis
Hi Croc
Yep thanks exactly what i said, but seeing the Chief has one she seems to think so should the Bobber
Cheers Andy
"Just because my path is different, doesn't mean i'm lost"
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Croc
I hear you Andy.  Having had a few older bikes over the years though, I find having a fuel gauge (either electronic or fluid level) a bit of a luxury anyhow.
The major problem with a Scout is that you're never quite sure how far you have to go when it does get to low fuel status. It doesn't help if you give it a bit whilst riding (as in zoom zoom!), I have found my fuel/mileage changes a lot depending on how stupid.. um.. enthusiastic I am when riding. ðŸ˜‰ðŸ˜‹
I'm Not Completely Useless . .
I Can Be Used As A Bad Example!

Kwinana W.A.

Ulysses   #48275
IMRG      #100932
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Andy Davis
Yep, recon she will have to live with it but recon I will be carting backup in the panniers just in case
Cheers
"Just because my path is different, doesn't mean i'm lost"
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Baz64
I do what Croc says. On a normal ride around town I’ll get to 180ks before the light goes on. I haven’t tested it however I believe you could get an extra 60ks from when the light goes on. As stated earlier though, depends how gentle you are with the throttle. She loves to get up and go but becomes a heavy drinker. Good luck Andy. 
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Rodd
One thing I've noticed with the Scout tank is that it doesn't always fill to capacity when it's sitting on the side stand, this is because it tends to airlock at the filler. After fast filling to the baffle plate it is usually possible to slow fill another litre before hitting the overflow. I always do this if I'm on a ride but if the bike is going to sit for a while I'll put a little less in to allow for fuel expansion. That extra litre can keep the fuel light off for up to 20km, which is useful because I only get 35km after the fuel light comes on. Don't ask how I know this.
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Croc
Yeah Rodd, the airlock thing is quite common with a lot of bikes.  I tend to rock the bike to slosh the fuel around in the tanks then slow fill to get the maximum fill for long trips.  The extra few drops can always be handy on long trips.  Still, just doing fuel topup for day to day I tend to let it do the airlock thing, no chance of overflow & it stops a little thing I noticed when I first got my Scout.  I filled it up to capacity a few times & noticed that there was a whistling type noise when I got home after.  It stopped after awhile but was coming from the tank area. It was the air pressure adjusting itself from inside the tank!  Keep in mind, this was in hot weather (in the NT) & I never noticed it in cooler times.  It makes sense, but if I was going long distance I still topped it up, you can't hear a small whistling noise bopping down the road (well, I don't, open face helmet & all!) ðŸ˜Ž
I'm Not Completely Useless . .
I Can Be Used As A Bad Example!

Kwinana W.A.

Ulysses   #48275
IMRG      #100932
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Dr.Shifty
Rodd wrote:
I only get 35km after the fuel light comes on. Don't ask how I know this.


In the early days of owning my Scout the fuel light came on as I left home heading for the city, probably 25kms. I ran out five blocks from the servo I was heading for. 🙁
Cheers, Kim.

From Woodrising (no, nobody else has heard of it either)
Rides a Springfield Dark Horse
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Rodd
I believe that and actually I've noticed that the light can come on and then go off again depending on where/how you are riding. I always try to fill up before seeing it. Once bitten.
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tallackn

Light comes on when tank is getting low and you are going downhill.

Also, bike is more likely to stall due to fuel starvation when you are going downhill too.

I have a suspicion that both the low fuel sensor and the fuel line output are in the rear of the tank.  So once that low fuel light comes on and stays on even on level road you really want to top up ASAP to avoid the embarrassment of pushing the bike.

Bloody Wellington and its bloody hills!  🙁

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Rodd
tallackn wrote:

Bloody Wellington and its bloody hills!  🙁



The Rimutakas are a good ride though 😎🙂,  if you can get a clean run on a low traffic day. (No time to check a fuel guage anyway on that road)
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