David
I’m interested in having dedicated ties down brackets for future travel and emergency trailer transport.

In researching the subject for my 2017 Springfield  I came across the following home made tie down bracket designed by an overseas forum member which I think is minimalist and will not interfere with the lowers many of us have on our bikes.

Rather than just looking into having a bracket made up for myself I wondered if others like the look of this bracket and whether we could look into having a batch of these made up by a local (Australian) steel fabrication firm for our use?

AC49D31F-4FF3-4D7F-A0FA-F8C6F84CABC2.jpeg 

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2017 Indian Springfield
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JuanPoop
Looks good to me - practical and minimalist.

Hoping to never need them, but I'm in.

Thanks for checking it out.


aka - John
2017 Springfield - grey / burgundy
Northern Beaches - Sydney
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V-Twin
Hi David, nice engineering mate.  Looks like a great idea to have a stealth anchor points.

I had my bike shipped over on the Spirit of Tasmania several times.  The anchor point that worked for me on my Vintage was on the engine guard, either side of the bike frame.  The trick is to cross over so the straps naturally pull towards the centre of the engine guard where it is attached to the bike frame.  Hopefully this illusion makes sense?

65F9F442-FF18-4BC5-990D-A9C355F9BB7E.jpeg
Let's be kind to one another.
Melbourne, Victoria
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David
V-Twin wrote:
Hi David, nice engineering mate.  Looks like a great idea to have a stealth anchor points.

I had my bike shipped over on the Spirit of Tasmania several times.  The anchor point that worked for me on my Vintage was on the engine guard, either side of the bike frame.  The trick is to cross over so the straps naturally pull towards the centre of the engine guard where it is attached to the bike frame.  Hopefully this illusion makes sense?

65F9F442-FF18-4BC5-990D-A9C355F9BB7E.jpeg 


Thanks for the diagram V-twin 👍
2017 Indian Springfield
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MickB
Check out this video on how to tie a bike down without putting pressure on the fork seals. 
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David
Thanks for the video MickB - good info to consider fork seal pressure if the bike is not static (ie on a long trailer trip). Think I would be putting something soft between the lower forks and the tank straps - would also be cautious as to how much lateral force I put on the forks with the tie downs. 
Im not looking for a bike trailer but saw this tilt trailer recently which I thought looked well suited to loading and transporting a heavy road bike.

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2017 Indian Springfield
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damienpearse
The guy on the video is a salesman. He did a terrible job of tying it down.
I've been on the Spirit of tassie, and I've trailered my bikes more times than I would admit using the first method without an issue.
I also wouldn't be tying around the front guard bolts, it just doesn't seem right...
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MickB
I agree, however the point being made is pulling down on the forks puts pressure on the seals. 
I always tie on 4 points, I used 2 at the rear and tie them down to the front and 2 on the bottom fork legs towards the rear and 2 weeks ago and transported the bike 1,000 ks without a problem and no pressure on the forks. 
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