crash
What sort of noise does your drive train make when you are riding?

I had a service done recently and noticed that during periods of extended riding (+6hrs) something in the drive train was making quite a significant noise.  I suspect it was the belt.

It seemed that it was when I was under acceleration the noise was more prominent however just motoring along the noise is not as pronounced but is still there in the background.  When I pulled the clutch in, the problem seemed to stop (but whether it just went quieter because I was not accelerating I am not sure).

My pillion also queried the noise and thought that it sounded a bit odd.

I took it to the service shop and they said that they could not fault it.

My expectation is that the drive train does not produce a high pitched squeak as you move it.  Maybe I am being unreasonable and maybe my expectations are a little bit too high.

I am trying to gauge what is considered "normal" and acceptable.
Ulysses #30673
IMRG #AU100394
Current: RoadMaster (ebony and ivory)
Highett Victoria Australia
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V-Twin
May I suggest having a chat with Rick from All American?

As I was reading your post, I thought it would be interesting to see what might happen if you changed the brand of your oil... from my experience, I have not found Indian oil to be great (with all the cars and bikes I had before, when I had my oil changed, you could feel it... as an owner of your own car/bike, you know 'something' has changed (for better) - never felt that with Indian oil.  I have 16,000kms service coming up next week.  I am trying another oil so see how that does.  Once I have formulated my thoughts, I will share.

Keep us posted of your situation too.
Melbourne, Victoria
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Richard Dixon
My 2015 Vintage has a squeak while accelerating.. seems to be belt ? Adelaide service suggested an alignment issue...? but still there even after new tyre fitted..
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Sean Judd

My Chieftain seems to have developed a whistle. The best way of describing it is like the whistle the Scouts get from the tank. You open the tank lid, let the pressure release and the whistle has gone, however that doesn't work on the Chieftain. 

The noise doesn't seem to change with revs and remains pretty constant and it's loud enough that you can hear it over idle. It doesn't appear to be coming from the engine however I know how hard it can be to pinpoint where a noise is coming from.

Any thoughts?

Current 2018 Chieftain

Past 2016 Scout

Future I'm thinking old School 40s Chief. 

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V-Twin
Sean Judd wrote:
The noise doesn't seem to change with revs and remains pretty constant and it's loud enough that you can hear it over idle. It doesn't appear to be coming from the engine however I know how hard it can be to pinpoint where a noise is coming from.
Man, sorry to hear that you got an unwanted sound that wasn’t there before.  So, it sounds like the high pitched sound remains constant... can you hear it when the engine is idling?  Is the high pitch sound present the moment you start the bike?  Or does it come on after xx minutes of riding?  Does the hot or cold days make a difference?

My stab in the dark would be the fuel pump.  Can’t think of any other noise that is constant.
Melbourne, Victoria
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crash
If it were the fuel pump you would hear the noise as soon as power is applied (but the bike not started).  
If you can hear it over idle, I am assuming that the bike is not moving.
Let's eliminate what it can't be - and the reasons why.
Can't be motor then it would potentially change with the revs as everything starts to speed up. 
Can't be drive train - cause the bikes not moving and it doesn't change with movement. 
Can't be gearbox - same reasoning and it doesn't change with movement. 
Can't be the windshield - because this requires motion for the whistle to start.
Can't be fuel pump - because it would occur even before the bike was started (I am assuming that this is not happening).
Can't be air intake - because the sound would change as you open the throttle.
I would not have thought electrical because it would again occur as the power is applied but before the motor starts.

It could be that the fuel line is restricted in some way and the pump is pumping at the same velocity - thereby casuing the whistle - this would not whistle before the engine starts because it's not sucking any juice (maybe).
It could also be that the bike is trying to get more fuel than the fuel pump is delivering (in which case it could be the fuel pump - but because it's not delivering)
Ulysses #30673
IMRG #AU100394
Current: RoadMaster (ebony and ivory)
Highett Victoria Australia
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adge82
Electrical noise through the speakers maybe?
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OzOldie
That'd be likely related to unsuppressed spark and would then increase in frequency as the revs increased.
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